Mohamed Abdelkarim

Oh, I am so sorry! I didn’t mean to scratch your face #2

The play relies on the notion of “ugliness” and on the act of savagery. It proposes a redefinition of savagery in a time of crisis. While questioning the archetype of ugliness through a collection of narratives, masks and images, the play floats over historical and contemporary drama productions. In the subgenre of horror films, the Zombie is an antagonist, an infected human, rotten and ugly! It is a creature that threatens humans with its infection. In One Thousand and One Nights, also known as Arabian Nights, The Ghoul is a fearsome creature, who floats between life and death, again, an ugly creature. It threatens the king. In drama productions of zombie films and Arabian Nights, Zombies and the Ghoul are considered ugly antagonists with monstrous bodies, while the perfect human is the protagonist who gets rid of those creatures. Both dramas emphasize the ugly body as an antagonist who deserves to be killed.
Through the models of Zombies and of the Ghoul, the play imagines a possible mode of existence in times of perpetual crisis. Through a dark edition of A Thousand and One Nights the project thinks through an hypothesis: [if savagery is a mode of resistance, how can we contemplate its aesthetic?].